Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace

Cite this

Introduction

The work is often based on group interaction and communication between several independent individuals. They need to work effectively and productively together to achieve a common goal, but sometimes this can be difficult. In particular, in the course of joint activities, people may have disagreements that lead to stress and reduced morale. Interpersonal conflicts, the cause of which can be both a difference in personal values ​​and opinions about the process of completing a work task, are common in a workplace. Despite the fact that there are other types of conflicts in the workplace, this type may be challenging to resolve. At the same time, the consequences of unresolved interpersonal conflict can be a decrease in job satisfaction, feelings of depression, loneliness, and anxiety. Therefore, managers need to pinpoint the causes of the clash and develop coping strategies that are appropriate for the situation.

On-Time Delivery!
Get your customized and 100% plagiarism-free paper done in as little as 3 hours
Let’s start
322 specialists online

Background

The interests and views of people may not always coincide, which leads to conflict situations. Conflict can be defined as a “series of disagreement or incompatibility between opinions and principles” (Yingshan et al., 2016, p. 542). Interpersonal conflict is a clash between two people who have a reason for disagreement. More specifically, individuals feel the impossibility of achieving goals, resource constraints, and unnecessary interference by a colleague or group (Yingshan et al., 2016). This view of a conflict situation describes disagreements in the work environment, where people are forced to work towards a common goal but cannot effectively interact.

Conflicts in a workplace are part of everyday interaction between people. Gigol (2019) notes that conflict management takes “over 20% of managers’ working hours regardless of their position in the organizational structure and hierarchy” (p. 25). There are various reasons for disagreements within the framework of work relationships. In particular, disagreements can arise on an organizational, intergroup, and interpersonal, which requires specific mitigation strategies for each case (Gigol, 2019). The consequences of conflicts can be stress, low self-esteem, and burnout, so they need to be worked with. Kuriakose et al. (2019) emphasize that interpersonal conflict negatively aggravates the feeling of loneliness. In general, conflict situations negatively affect employee well-being and productivity.

Conflicts also differ in the levels at which they occur and, therefore, in reasons and participants. Gigol and Sypniewska (2019) emphasize that interpersonal conflicts can be divided into subcategories of task and relationship. The first type arises on the basis of different views on the process of performing work tasks, while the second concerns the values ​​and beliefs of people (Gigol & Sypniewska, 2019). Depending on the reasons for the conflict, the manager needs to choose the correct coping strategy.

Resolving interpersonal conflicts

The work is often based on group interaction and communication between several independent individuals. They need to work effectively and well together to achieve a common goal, but sometimes this can be difficult. In particular, in the course of joint activities, people may have disagreements that lead to conflicts. Interpersonal conflicts, the cause of which can be both a difference in personal values ​​and opinions about the process of completing a work task, are common. Despite the fact that there are other types of conflicts in the workplace, this type is the most interesting and difficult to resolve. At the same time, the consequences of unresolved interpersonal conflict can be a decrease in job satisfaction, feelings of depression, loneliness, and anxiety. To resolve interpersonal conflicts in the workplace, managers need to ensure communication between participants and find a compromise solution.

Background

The interests and views of people may not always coincide, which leads to conflict situations. Conflict can be defined as a “series of disagreement or incompatibility between opinions and principles” (Yingshan et al., 2016, p. 542). Interpersonal conflict is a clash between two people who have a reason for disagreement. More specifically, individuals feel the impossibility of achieving goals, resource constraints, and unnecessary interference by a colleague or group (Yingshan et al., 2016). This view of a conflict situation describes disagreements in the work environment, where people are forced to work towards a common goal but cannot effectively interact.

Conflicts also differ in the levels at which they occur and, therefore, in reasons and participants. In particular, disagreements can arise on an organizational, intergroup, and interpersonal, which requires specific mitigation strategies for each case (Gigol, 2019). Gigol and Sypniewska (2019) emphasize that interpersonal conflicts can be divided into subcategories of task and relationship. The first type arises on the basis of different views on the process of performing work tasks, while the second concerns the values ​​and beliefs of people (Gigol & Sypniewska, 2019). Depending on the reasons for the conflict, the manager needs to choose the correct coping strategy. Interpersonal conflicts in a workplace are part of how people interact, which makes them unavoidable. The consequences of conflicts can be stress, low self-esteem, and burnout, so they need to be worked with. Kuriakose et al. (2019) emphasize that interpersonal conflict negatively aggravates the feeling of loneliness. In general, conflict situations negatively affect employee well-being, reducing job satisfaction and productivity.

Yes, we can!
Our experts can deliver a custom Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace paper for only $13.00 $11/page
Learn More
322 specialists online

Findings

Not only the manager should be actively involved in resolving the conflict, but also its participants. Gigol (2019) emphasizes that passive coping strategies such as avoidance or yielding can negatively affect job satisfaction. In turn, this aspect leads to an increased risk of intention to leave the job. Integrating and cooperation strategies, on the other hand, have a positive effect on job satisfaction and reduce the risk of leaving, as well as stress levels (Gigol, 2019). Additionally, active conflict management strategies are positively correlated with the vigor of employees and work engagement (Gigol, 2019). In turn, higher job satisfaction and work engagement largely determine the productivity of employees and the company, which makes active coping styles preferable.

In a situation of interpersonal conflict, the manager needs to act with the utmost care and choose an individual approach. Gigol and Sypniewska (2019) note that the most valuable qualities are the ability to honestly express an attitude to the problem, as well as the perception of another person’s perspective. Successful management of conflicts assumes that a leader cannot take a passive position and ignore an existing or emerging conflict, even if seemingly insignificant (Gigol & Sypniewska, 2019). Thus, trying to resolve conflict and being open to coping with the situation is the foundation of successful disagreement management. However, an incorrectly chosen approach can have an adverse impact on the relationship between the participants.

Proposed Solutions

Communication is at the heart of the resolution of interpersonal conflict, so it is extremely important for the manager and the participants to establish the right contact. First of all, it is necessary to treat each other with respect so as not to aggravate the negative emotions caused by disagreement (Yingshan et al., 2016). This stage is part of the initiation of an active conflict resolution process that ensures a successful outcome. To mitigate interpersonal conflict, participants must engage in a dialogue in which all aspects can be discussed. In this situation, you need to make sure that all participants are calm and ready for action; otherwise, they may begin to violently express emotions or use violence, which will only aggravate the situation (Yingshan et al., 2016). The manager can act as a mediator who sets the rules for the dialogue and monitor the achievement of its goal.

When resolving interpersonal conflict, it is important that each of the participants listens and understands the reasons for the disagreement. In this situation, it is necessary to involve them in active listening, which is quite difficult for many (Yingshan et al., 2016). The manager should let each of the participants speak and make sure that the atmosphere remains relaxed. It is important to summarize key points to ensure a correct and complete understanding of the aspects of the conflict. This process helps foster perspective-taking, which is “trying to understand the other person’s needs, concerns, difficulties, and pain in this situation to a similar extent as you understand your own needs” (Yingshan et al., 2016, p. 544). In general, these actions should lead to an understanding of the fundamentals of the problem that has arisen and a discussion of trade-offs that will help in solving it. Based on the information received during the conversation, the manager needs to choose a strategy that would satisfy the needs of all participants.

Conclusion

Interpersonal conflicts are common and are based on differences of opinion, both personal and professional. Such situations, if left unattended, can have a negative impact on work engagement and job satisfaction. Therefore, managers need to practice active participation in resolving interpersonal conflicts, acting as mediators. It is necessary to establish communication between the participants within the framework in which they can calmly discuss the problems that have arisen. Based on the information received in the conversation, it will be possible to make a decision that would be a compromise for everyone.

References

Gigol, T. (2019). Approach to interpersonal conflicts in workplace and work engagement. Organization and Management, 2(185), 25-41.

Gigol, T., & Sypniewska, B. A. (2019). Interpersonal conflicts in the workplace and authentic leadership. In L. Tauginiene (ed.), Corporate social responsibility and business ethics in the Central and Eastern Europe (pp. 37-62). Journal of East European Management Studies. Web.

Cut 15% OFF your first order
We’ll deliver a custom Human Resource Management paper tailored to your requirements with a good discount
Use discount
322 specialists online

Kuriakose, V., Sreejesh, S., Wilson, P. R., & Anusree, M. R. (2019). The differential association of workplace conflicts on employee well-being: The moderating role of perceived social support at work. International Journal of Conflict Management, 30(5), 680-705. Web.

Yingshan, B., Zhu, F., Hu, Y., & Cui, N. (2016). The research of interpersonal conflict and solution strategies. Psychology, 7(4), 541-545. Web.

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

BusinessEssay. (2022, September 13). Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace. Retrieved from https://business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/

Reference

BusinessEssay. (2022, September 13). Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace. https://business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/

Work Cited

"Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace." BusinessEssay, 13 Sept. 2022, business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/.

References

BusinessEssay. (2022) 'Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace'. 13 September.

References

BusinessEssay. 2022. "Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace." September 13, 2022. https://business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/.

1. BusinessEssay. "Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace." September 13, 2022. https://business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/.


Bibliography


BusinessEssay. "Interpersonal Conflicts in a Workplace." September 13, 2022. https://business-essay.com/interpersonal-conflicts-in-a-workplace/.